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Kreatiini mielestäni ok aine. Ei tee ihmeitä mutta selvästi auttaa saamaan sen pari toistoa enemmän tiukassa sarjassa. Ja tosiaan nykypäivänä halpaa kuin saippua.

 

 

 

2019 tammikuu muokkaus

 

Euroopan edullisimmat kreatiinit

15-30% alennus koko tilauksesta koodilla: MUSCLEMP

 

Joo eli siis tollasen Fast perus creatiini 500g purkin Prismasta. No on kai nuo tulokset kohtuullisia, ite aina toivois että nousis enemmän..

Muokattu: , käyttäjä: soccerman

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No volyymitreeneissä sillä sarjakestävyydelläkin on jotain merkitystä; siksi on turha verrata pelkästään lihakseen latautunutta kreatiinia ja maksimivoimaa.

KraPyrun hinta toisaalta nollaa tehokkaasti sen pienen hyödyn.

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Viimeiset 8v oon ottanut putkeen kreaa, siitä 2-3v kreapyruä ja loput monoa. Voimatoissa ei ole eroa, mutta jotenkin lihakset tuntuu herkemmiltä = suoritukset räjähtävämpiä pyruvaatilla. Sarjakestävyydestä on vaikea sanoa mitään pelkästään omista treeneistä, siihen vaikuttaa niin moni juttu. Ketodietillä kuitenkin lyhyissä sarjoissa tuntu pyruvaatti toimivan hyvin. Nyt tauko menossa, jonka jälkeen alan ottaa sitraattia saa nähdä kuinka toimii.

 

Tossa kakkospositiossa olevan tutkimuksen mukaan voisi kuitenkin olettaa pyruvaatin hiukan auttavan.

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10g menee joka ainoa päivä, lepopäivänäkin. Ilman taukoja mennyt parisen vuotta. Näin mennään.. Hautaan asti :aluekomentaja:


Harrastukset: Musklen chat, reeni ja aggressiivinen säästäminen

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Siikatkaapas tätä:

 

Journal of Sports Sciences, 2004, 22, 95–113

Dietary supplements

RON J. MAUGHAN,* DOUG S. KING and TREVOR LEA

 

Full article here:

http://www.sportsoracle.com/uploads/2601.pdf

 

Section of relevance:

Creatine
Creatine has been used by many successful athletes, particularly in track and field athletics, but in many other sports as well. Some indication of the extent of its use comes from the fact that the estimated sales of creatine to athletes in the USA alone in 1997 amounted to over 300,000 kg. This represents a remarkable growth, as its use first became popular in sport after the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona. What distinguishes
creatine from most other purported ergogenic aids is that it seems to be effective in improving performance. More significantly, perhaps, its use is not prohibited by the governing bodies of sport and, although long-term safety studies have not been undertaken, there appear to be no harmful side-effects even when very large doses are taken, at least in the quantities that are necessary to produce an ergogenic
effect. There are many excellent reviews of the effects of creatine supplementation, but the picture changes rapidly as new information emerges in this topical area. Greenhaff (2000) and Williams et al. (1999) haveprovided recent overviews.
The highest tissue concentrations of creatine are found in skeletal muscle, and approximately two-thirds
of the total is in the form of creatine phosphate. Creatine phosphate is capable of rapid regeneration of ATP within the cell cytoplasm, but a limited amount is available. Increasing muscle creatine phosphate should Dietary supplements 101
increase the available energy supply. Creatine occurs
naturally in the diet, being present in meat: 1 kg of fresh
steak contains about 5 g of creatine. The normal daily
intake is less than 1 g, but the estimated daily
requirement for the average individual is about 2 g.
This directly contradicts the above article
The body has a limited capacity to synthesize creatine in
the liver, kidney and pancreas and in other tissues, but
the primary site of synthesis in humans is the kidney.
This supplies the amount required in excess of the
dietary intake, and is also the only way in which
vegetarians can meet their requirement. Synthesis
occurs from amino acid precursors (arginine and
glycine), but the synthetic pathway is suppressed when
dietary creatine intake is high.
The first study to systematically investigate the effects
of supplementation of large amounts of creatine was
that of Harris et al. (1992). In a comprehensive study,
they showed that ingestion of small amounts of creatine
(1 g or less) had a negligible effect on the circulating
creatine concentration, whereas feeding higher doses
(5 g) resulted in an approximately 15-fold increase.
Repeated feeding of 5-g doses every 2 h maintained the
plasma concentration at about 1 mmol  l71 over an 8-h
period. Repeated feeding of creatine (5 g four times a
day) over 4–5 days resulted in a marked increase in the
total creatine content of the quadriceps femoris muscle.
An increase in muscle creatine content was apparent
within 2 days of starting this regimen, and the increase
was greatest in those with a low initial concentration; in
some cases, an increase of 50% was observed.
Approximately 20% of the increase in total muscle
creatine content is accounted for by creatine phosphate.
Co-ingestion of creatine and carbohydrate, which
results in high circulating insulin, may increase the
storage of creatine in muscle (Green et al., 1996a,b).
Most authors who have reviewed the published
literature have concluded that the available evidence
supports a beneficial effect of creatine on performance
in short-term high-intensity exercise (Greenhaff, 2000).
Of three recently published meta-analyses, two have
concluded that creatine supplementation has positive
effects on strength, power and lean body mass (Branch,
2003; Nissen and Sharp, 2003), while the other (Misic
and Kelley, 2002) concluded that there was no effect.
The reasons for this discrepancy are not entirely clear.
Effects are seen in particular in the later stages of
multiple short efforts with limited recovery, but
improvements are sometimes seen in single sprints
lasting less than 30 s. There is little information on the
effects of creatine supplementation on the performance
of more prolonged exercise, but there is little reason to
suspect a positive effect.
The mechanism by which creatine supplementation
might improve performance is not entirely clear,
although it is clear that this effect is related to
increased muscle creatine phosphate. The rate of
creatine phosphate resynthesis after intense exercise
is enhanced after high-dose creatine supplementation
(Greenhaff et al., 1994). This allows faster recovery
after sprints as well as allowing more work to be done
during each subsequent high-intensity effort. These
effects will allow a greater amount of work to be done
in training and should therefore result in a greater
training response, although it is possible that by
maintaining the energy charge better during training,
the response will be less. This is especially important
in that the muscle creatine content remains high for
weeks or even months after only a few days of highdose
dietary creatine supplementation (Hultman et al.,
1996).
Many studies and much anecdotal evidence support
the suggestion that acute supplementation with creatine
is associated with a prompt gain in body mass. This
typically amounts to about 1–2 kg over a supplementation
period of 4–5 days, but may be more than this. In
reviewing those studies where changes in body mass
were reported, Branch (2003) reported 43 studies in
which body mass increased and 24 where no change
was seen; there was a statistically significant effect size
for both body mass and lean body mass. Another recent
meta-analysis puts the increases in muscle size and
strength in perspective. Nissen and Sharp (2003)
reported that creatine supplementation increases lean
mass and strength by 0.35% and 1.09% per week in
excess of the changes observed with resistance training
alone, but again effect sizes for the increased lean mass
and strength were small (0.26 and 0.36, respectively).
The rapid increases in body mass may be accounted
for by water retention. Increasing the creatine content
of muscle by 80–100 mmol  kg71 will increase intracellular
osmolality, leading to water retention. Hultman
et al. (1996) found a reduction in urinary output during
supplementation, which tends to confirm this. The
increased intramuscular osmolality due to creatine
itself, however, is not likely to be sufficient to account
for all of this water retention. It has been suggested that
co-ingestion of creatine and carbohydrate, which results
in high circulating insulin (Green et al., 1996a,b), may
stimulate glycogen synthesis, which will further increase
the water content of muscle. There is some preliminary
evidence for a stimulation of protein synthesis in
response to creatine supplementation (Ziegenfuss et
al., 1997), but further experimentation is required. It is
unlikely that major effects on muscle protein content
can be achieved within 4–5 days, so the reported gains
in muscle strength within the same time-scale are
difficult to explain.
The effects of the long-term use of large doses of
creatine are unknown and its use may pose a health risk.
There is concern about possible adverse effects on renal
102 Maughan et al.
function, in particular in individuals with impaired
renal capacity. Studies on the response to long-term
creatine use are in progress but results are not yet
available. There have, however, been no reports of
adverse effects in any of the studies published in the
literature. One study that specifically examined renal
function in individuals supplementing with creatine
found no reason to believe that renal complications
were likely (Poortmans et al., 1997). Anecdotal reports
of an increased prevalence of muscle cramps in athletes
taking creatine supplements have been circulating for
some time, but there is no substance to these stories. It
is likely that any injury suffered by an athlete will be
ascribed to an easily identifiable change in habit, such as
the introduction of a new supplement.
Uninformed comment ascribed the deaths of three
American collegiate wrestlers in December 1999 to
creatine use, but this was not substantiated at the
formal inquiries conducted. Given the increase in
body mass that often accompanies supplementation,
it is possible that athletes who must reduce body
mass acutely to qualify for a particular weight
category might face particular problems. It is not
unusual in some sports for body mass to be reduced
by as much as 10% in the few days before
competition: if the mass loss necessary to make the
qualifying weight is 1–2 kg more than anticipated,
the measures required to achieve the target mass will
be unusually severe and may provoke serious and
potentially fatal complications related to dehydration
and hyperthermia.
It is usually recommended that athletes take 20 g
creatine  day71 for 4–5 days (a loading dose)
followed by 1–2 g  day71 (maintenance dose). The
muscle may be saturated with creatine when a dose
as small as 10 g  day71 is consumed for 3–4 days if
this is taken together with sufficient carbohydrate to
stimulate a marked elevation in circulating insulin.
Many athletes, however, work on the principle that
more is better and may greatly exceed these
amounts. Even with very large doses, however, the
possibility of adverse effects is remote. Creatine is a
small water-soluble molecule easily cleared by the
kidney, and the additional nitrogen load resulting
from supplementation is small. The same concerns
about renal damage have been raised in the context
of protein supplementation among strength athletes
and bodybuilders: these athletes may consume up to
3–4 g protein  kg71 BM day71 over very long
periods (Burke and Inge, 1994), but there is no
evidence that the theoretical problems of clearance of
the extra solute load are real.
Although there is no reason to suppose that there are
any risks to health associated with the long-term use of
high doses of creatine, the studies quoted above that
have used high doses (in the order of 20–30 g  day71)
have been of relatively short duration (5–14 days), and
long-term safety studies have not been performed.
Studies are currently under way to determine some of
the effects of long-term creatine supplementation; their
results will become available in due course. This leaves
the ethical question of whether the use of creatine
should be disallowed on the grounds of its ergogenic
effect, as is the case with other normal dietary
components such as caffeine. As more information
emerges, this issue will be resolved and the governing
bodies of sport will make a decision.

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ite käytän kreaa noin vuoden kuuri menossa siitähän ei tarvi pitää taukoa ja mitä pitempään käyttää sitä paremmat vaikutukset, pitkäaikais käyttö on vasta 5 vuotta krealla joten noi 1kk-12kk on viä lyhyehköjä! joka päivä 5g olen ainakin huomannut vaikutuksia.


If it bleeds, we can kill it.

Arnold Schwarzenegger

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Kreatiinin määrä lihaksessa on suurimmillaan noin puolen tunnin päästä kreatiinin nauttimisesta. Lihaksen kyky vastaanottaa kreatiinia palautuu noin 24 tunnissa, eli kreatiini kannattanee nauttia ennen treeniä ja noin vuorokauden välein. Minulla on kirja lääkkeet ja lisäravinteet urheilussa siellä on iso juttu kreasta, haittavaikutuksiahan ei ole todettu alle 5vuoden käytössä sen mukaan ja yli 5vuotta ei olla tutkittu.

 

Kirjan toimituskuntaan ja pääkirjoittajiin kuului viisi henkilöä:

 

Antti Alaranta

Proviisori 2000, FaT 2006. Väitöskirja käsitteli urheilijoiden lääkeaineiden käyttöä ja dopingasenteita.

 

Juha Hulmi

LitM (2004), liikuntafysiologian jatko-opiskelija, (LitT),Liikuntabiologian laitos, Jyväskylän yliopisto. Väitöskirjan aihe: "Voimaharjoittelun ja proteiiniravinnon fysiologiset ja molekyylibiologiset vaikutukset".

 

Joonas Mikkonen

Farmaseutti 2003, elintarviketiet. yo 2002-. Valmistuu elintarviketieteiden maisteriksi 2008 pääaineena ravitsemustiede. Luennoinut ravitsemuksesta Farmasian tiedekunnassa sekä pitänyt ravitsemuskoulutuksia yrityksille.

 

Jari Rossi

FM 1999, FT 2003. Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Työskentelee post-doctoral fellow tutkijana Yhdysvalloissa lihavuustutkimuksen parissa.

 

Antti Mero

LitT 1987, Valmennusopin dosentti 1991,Liikuntabiologian laitos, Jyväskylän yliopisto. Päätutkimusalue nykyisin ”Harjoituksen, harjoittelun ja ravinnon fysiologiset vaikutukset elimistöön: erityisesti aminohappo- ja proteiiniaineenvaihdunta”.


If it bleeds, we can kill it.

Arnold Schwarzenegger

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Eiköhän malmi ala podellakin liikkuman entistä kovempaa. Joku syksy sit samaan aikaan lavalle, esim ens vuonna :tsemppiä: ?


Harrastukset: Musklen chat, reeni ja aggressiivinen säästäminen

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Krea monohydraatti toimii ihan ok mutta kesällä varsinkaan en innostu sen käytöstä kauheasti. Ainakin itsellä se aiheuttaa v*tunmoisen nestepöhön. Leuan alle tulee ns. koala pussi samalla kun naama turpoaa ja kaksoisleuka irvistää peilistä, varma tapa karkottaa mimmit ja viettää kesä pornoleffojen seurassa. Toisaalta dietillä pirun mukava käyttää kun nivelet eivät kipuile nestekertymän ansiosta. Tiedemies Hulkki on paasannut tuosta kreasta sen verran paljon, että esim. välipäivinä turha ottaa kreaa, koska kreavarastot eivät tyhjene mihinkään kun silloin levätään. Eli palautusjuomassa nautitaan krea(10g) nopean hiilarin kanssa ja thats it. Mitään eroa en ole huomannut nappaileeko tuota joka päivä vai treenipäivinä only, samanlailla futaa ja vuosia olen siis nappailut kreaa, Hulkin tapaan jämähdin. Creapurea aina luonnollisesti. Pitäisi ottaa testiin jokin toinen krea tuote, ilmeisesti Krea Alkalyn ei kerää nestettä eikä pyruvaatti?

 

Tässä vielä Bulkki-Hulkin juttuja joihin viittasin:

 

"Ja tuota kreatiinin juomista ennen treeniä tai treenin aikana en oikein ymmärrä, mitä pointtia tuossa muka on? Kreatiini ei kuitenkaan toimi instantisti, vaan kreatiinifosfaattivarastojen täyttämisen ja ylläpidon kautta (ja tuo taas toteutuu riippumatta siitä, otetaanko kreatiinia aamulla, illalla, ennen treeniä, treenin jälkeen vaiko keskellä yötä)."

 

"Olen käyttänyt kreatiinia jo monen vuoden ajan ehkä hieman omalaatuisella (vaikkakin hyvin yksinkertaisella) tavalla, johon päädyin luettuani vuosia sitten kirjan kreatiinista. En tee mitään tankkausvaihetta, vaan otan yksinkertaisesti 10 g kreatiinimonohydraattia aina palkkarissa. Lepopäivinä tai kevyillä viikoilla en käytä kreatiinia."

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Joo mutta jos on joku tilaisuus missä sitä roppaa pitää esitellä niin pitää sen aikaa taukoa siitä sitten. Äkkiä ne sen tuomat nesteet lähtee.

Muutaman päivän nyt syöny taas tauon jälkeen ja kyllähän se mukavasti pöhöttää.

 

Mulle ainakin ihan sama vaikka posket vähän turvonneena käy kaupassa ja koulussa. Joillekin sitten varmaan ei.

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Meillä kuikeloilla ja isoissa rasvoissa olevilla yms. siitä ei oo haittaa, mutta näillä kavereilla jotka on kireitä tms. niin he eivät toivo välttämättä nesteitä paljon. Lisäksi jollain turpoaa kasvot tuosta nesteestä.

nyt dieetillä tuon nesteturvotuksen huomaa. ei suoranaisesti nyt liity kreatiiniin, mutta kroppaan kun änkään vähänkin nestettä, niin lommot poskista häviää.

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